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20121108
20121116
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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
around the hill. there is a domestic component to driving foreign policy that can't be overlooked. >> eliot: tina? >> his speech at the convention was an audition piece. >> eliot: not every audition works. >> yes. that was a kerry no one saw before. i was -- in the stadium. people were kind of -- sighed when he got up there. he knocked it out of park. >> eliot: people remembered that. >> he was the surprise sleeper speaker. >> eliot: treasury, tim geithner leaving. does he take somebody from wall street? >> undoubtedly. >> eliot: you think he does? >> absolutely. >> eliot: come on! so many people understand banking finance better than those guys. >> yes. ralph nader. >> eliot: robert rice. i would put him in any cabinet position. host of new york 1 errol louis and editor tina but dupuy. our special election night of the view finder is ahead. more "viewpoint" coming up. smiles make more smiles. when the chocolate is hershey's. life is delicious. [ piano plays ] troy polamalu's going deeper. ♪ ♪ and so is
in the foreign policy land. many liberals would have a critique of some of his lack of process in some of the foreign policy stuff. is part of what he's saying that the recalcitrance of the republican house might bring out that aspect of president obama? >> well, i think there are two things. first, i think steve is absolutely correct. the republicans forced his hand. by showing that they were going to be entrenched opposition that could not be reformed or changed, he had to assert himself. the debt ceiling debacle was the place where it all came together because i think the country saw how the resistance would not move and his progressive allies were profoundly disappointed that he was, in fact, rolled by the republican issue. so i think in the foreign policy realm he was determined to show that as a democratic president he could be strong and obviously his effort to get osama bin laden was a big piece of that. but his policy towards syria, his policy toward the iraq war, his effort with afghanistan was all designed to blunt that effort. >> that's true. >> as much as he is committed t
hill, the prime minister should make a speech about foreign-policy. let me say at the outset that this is a government that is outward looking, standing up for interest in the world, protecting security at home and promoting our values abroad. we spoke up for the arabs bring. we led international action to support the libyan people and getting rid of muammar gaddafi. we stepped up the use sanctions against iran, and at the forefront of efforts to isolate assad in syria. we've got us out of the bailout fund and rejecting the treaty that was not of interest. i am a prime minister who said even in tough economic times of britain will not break its promises to the poorest of our world. i am sharing the united nations high-level panel of development with ambition of eradicating absolute poverty in our world. i am a prime minister who will work closely with president obama in a renewed effort on the middle east peace process, and let us congratulate him tonight on winning a historic second term. yes, i am a prime minister who will -- you will bring troops home from afghanistan. let
the table. we should teach them to heel when it comes to foreign policy, teach them to stop making messes in oash -- other people's yards. when it comes to domestic policy, teach them to stay out of the bedroom, out of our beds. term limits would be good, too. when we give power to politicians, they should know they don't get to keep it forever. if a few years, they bring the poir back to us and drop it at our feet. good boy. now, back to the kennel. that's not going to be easy, but at least we made a little progress this election. some states elected people who support liberty like senator flake and congressman amsah and others. georgia voters said yes to expanding charter schools. two states voted to allow all adults, not just sick people to use marijuana. several said yes to gay marriage, and michigan defeated a plan that would have made unions more powerful. there was some progress, not much, but some. there's some good news. that's our show. thank you for watching.
. we should teach them to heel when it comes to foreign policy, teach them to stop making messes in oash -- other people's yards. when it comes to domestic policy, teach them to stay out of the bedroom, out of our beds. term limits would be good, too. when we give power to politicians, they should know they don't get to keep it forever. if a few years, they bring the poir back to us and drop it at our feet. good boy. now, back to the kennel. that's not going to be easy, but at least we made a little progress this election. some states elected people who support liberty like senator flake and congressman amsah and others. georgia voters said yes to expanding charter schools. two states voted to allow all adults, not just sick people to use marijuana. several said yes to gay marriage, and michigan defeated a plan that would have made unions more powerful. there was some progress, not much, but some. there's some good news. that's our show. thank you for watching.
: let's go to foreign policy because "the washington times" as this headline -- scott wilson, do you expect that he does that? troops on the ground? guest: i do not expect troops on the grand. as far as the president would go in syria, the next step is some kind of a no-fly zone. you will start seeing the model that he put in place and advocated for in libya. he is someone who moves incrementally. the next real step is the first plunge into military would be directly harming the rebels. they do not know the rebels that well. they do not want to start sending heavy weapons to groups that are clearly influenced by islamists. so that has been one caution. then the next step would likely be considering some sort of international no-fly zone like what took place in libya. host: iran's nuclear program? do we know what he might do? guest: i think in terms of old assertions of next steps, some of that may wait for the next secretary of state. this is something that the next secretary of state would be shepherding through and then stick it in somebody else's lap. it is probably strategically
director and i'm delighted to see all of you here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of other presidential election is certainly evident by the standing room only crowd that we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition. transition even with the same president. transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the presidential cycle to have an impact on the policy process. and so i'm, i take it, as a good sign there is so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now i think that the transition from a first to a second obama administration may of course begin the day after an election but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the president's new or old team takes shape and where necessary seeks confirmation. as the new old team goes through the inevitable period of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities, and as other issues, domestic issues, fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and let's not forget as the world recalibrate
relations, richard haass and author of "foreign policy begins at home: the case for putting america's house in order." and from washington, we've got nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent, andrea mitchell. the great john heilemann also here. >> we also have willie geist. >> the great willie geist also here. >> we did your show. it's a cute little show. >> it's fun, right? it's a good show. >> how's your new life? >> it started nine seconds ago, so i'll let you know. >> your swan song on friday being called by some the greatest swan song since the beatles recording abbey road. >> the "m.a.s.h." finale, i got a lot of that. >> so what's the chances that this paula broadwell, is that her name? >> yes. >> paula broadwell is on "morning joe" the one day that i'm off over the last three years. i missed her. >> crapshoot. >> she was impressive, right? >> yeah, we had her on-sped her book about general petraeus, "all in." she was on the show and we walked away impressed by her. she's very smart. she's obviously a veteran herself, has served, went to west point. obviously, we had no inkling of wha
american. and all three are very conservative on foreign policy. some domestic policies, they will find ortiz and rubio will slightly lead some of the charge in the republican ranks in the senate to adopt some kind of comprehensive immigration reform. i think the time has come for the country to do comprehensive reform. as i have said many times over the last year or two, immigration reform is going to change the politics of the nation just by the nature of who eventually becomes or is able to regularize their status and be able to vote. it was ronald reagan in 1986 who signed into law the last comprehensive immigration reform, which allowed about 3 million people to regularize their status -- most of them hispanic. within five years, those people were able to vote. effecting much of what happened in the clinton era in terms of what was happening in democratic resurgence. i think this time around, we're talking 11 million to 12 million people. immigration reform is accomplished next year, did you can assume within five, six, seven years many of those people will then be able to enter th
in their programming ucla. our coverage begins at 1:00 p.m. eastern followed by a speech on foreign policy. this'll be his third time speaking since becoming prime minister. then later, be no rennae talks about social enterprise. -- bono talks about social and a price. host: we want to welcome the former lieutenant governor of maryland michael steele welcome back to c-span. what happened tuesday guest: i think from the democrats perspective they got an affirmation of the policies and the direction that the president articulated. as a i would say there wasn't much articulation there but they showed they are spoir in getting their vote to the table and with the pick up in the senate i think a lot of people kind of looked at the senate as one of those fire walls that the republicans needed to pick up two seats was a profound effort as well. and it really makes the policy discussion take on a very different hugh than it otherwise would. and i think for the republicans it was one of those come to jesus 340e789s politically where they have to reassess and evaluate whether they want to be a relevant p
. we are not going to have a foreign policy shop stocked with architects of the iraq war. we are not going to do it. we had the chance to do that if we wanted to do that, as a country. and we said no, last night, loudly. now, to be fair. if you are a conservative or if you are rooting for the republicans, a few things did go your way. republicans did not lose that senate seat that they might have lost in arizona. jon kyl's old senate seat goes to another republican, to jeff flake. also, republicans did not lose that other senate seat they might have lost in nevada, the old jon ensign seat that was given to dean heller. it stays with him. and while president obama carried 28 states last time, he carried 26 or 27 states this time, depending on how florida goes. that means republicans did lose everything else, but got back indiana and also north carolina. so it was not a totally hopeless night for republicans. also, hey, remember the crazy thaddeus mccotter seat in michigan, where thaddeus mccotter screwed up and they had to run this reindeer herder, santa claus impersonator for
an article calling the other fiscal cliff as foreign policy. the shake up on the foreign relations committees -- three of the chair and a ranking member being gone but if senator kerry would move positions it would be a complete clean slate on how often set aside and wondering how it affects the president's ability to build up the top line foreign policy issues, like syria and iran, but also others like foreign aid which has a nice rubber duckie on the catalog today. it helps pay our salaries. >> i think bob corker will be interesting as ranking member on foreign relations. he skipped the republican convention this summer to go to the middle east. and he has been doing a lot of traveling. he is super smart about these kinds of things. i think he will try to mold himself a little bit -- not completely, like dick lugar, honestly. he will be against the hawks i think on a number of occasions. we did a story recently about him and we had john mccain talk about how much -- how much he respected and although they did not always see eye to eye. but i think the foreign relations panel in both chamber
partisan than i thought it would be including matters on foreign policy. it felt it first on the debate of the resolution to authorize president bush to go into kuwait to get hussein out. along the way, there have been many great moments of bipartisan achievement, and, in fact, i would say that of all of things i'm feeling good about that i've been a part of in the 24 years i've been in the senate, not a one of them have been partisan. .. >> be effective that is that you get 0%. >> senator kyl what happened? why this happened? >> forgive me for doing this, but think you doing this and thank you to "the wall street journal" for making this possible. mr. murdoch, it's great have a chance to visit with you. mr. prime minister, i haven't had a chance to visit with him as of yet. he is very good at this. i'm thinking about running for reelection. [laughter] john mccain and joe lieberman. the reason that joe came back -- what a wonderful lady she is. >> have you finished your rounds? >> a have to do that because i do appreciate this opportunity. i came to the congress in 1972 as a young fresh
. followed by prime minister david cameron's spetch on foreign policy at the annual lord mayor 's man quet. this will be the third time speaking before the banquet since becoming prime minister in 2010. join us for his remarks at 3:30 p.m. eastern. and then later at georgetown university, musician and activist bono talks about social enterprise and social movements like his project red campaign. our coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. eastern. now a discussion about the results of the 2012 election with media research president brent bozell, coordinator for the tea party patriots and president of the susan b. anthony list. from the press club, this is about 40 minutes. >> good afternoon. thank you for coming. my name is richard vigory, chairman of the conservative.q.com. i will speak for a few minutes and introduce five nationally known, recognized conservative leaders. and we will each talk for a little bit and then we will open it for q & a. battle to take over the republican party begins today. and the failed republican leadership should resign. out of last night's disaster comes good news, ho
republican strategy? they are social, economic, and foreign policy, fully embracing each one. what we had was one wobbly leg with about $1 billion from the republican side from the top of the ticket and affecting every other senate race in the country because of that influence. when fully engaged, each of those policy areas, a real mandate is created, and there is a resonance that brings public policy leaders into office so those areas can be implemented, without fully engaging on each of those areas and social policy, we leave the votes on the table every single time. what we had was a factor truth on social issues on one side but a full embrace of the war on social issues on the other side. obama have launched a war over abortion and the life issue. therefore, he got to completely decide what the issue was, and what is it? rape. abortion and rape in the minds of many voters, because the debate was not fully engage. his weaknesses, is extreme positions on late storm abortions -- late term abortions, i'm not saving children born after a failed of abortion, none of these were explored in a
through foreign policy magazine, tom ricks, author of "the generals." not everything that you found is necessarily that great about modern day generals today. >> before we go there, start with the model general. you say the model general was general george marshall who gave his generals a few months to succeed, die or be relieved. >> that was accountability. that was the way they worked in world war ii. you get out there and if you can't do the job, we will get rid of you. 155 division commanders in the army in world war ii. of the guys who commanded, 16 were fired. what -- it was a darwinian process. very hard-nosed, not gentle. and they moved up guys who could succeed which is why we know names today like ridgway, gavin and eisenhower. eisenhower began 1940 as lieutenant colonel, executive officer of an infantry regiment. marshall reached out and said that's who you need to be supreme allied commander. >> how did marshall rise the way he rose without going to battle. having the battle scars of world war i or world war ii. >> it was interesting. marshall didn't know him particularl
with the president and shares his views on foreign policy. well, two different countries, two very different stories. iran's defense minister now claiming that two iranian planes did shoot at a u.s. drone over the persian gulf. iran claims the drone was within its airspace when fired upon. the white house has said the drone was flying in international airspace. the unmanned drone was not damaged. >> lady liberty lighting up new york harbor for the first time since super storm sandy hit. the statue serves as a beacon of hope for other storm victims. liberty island was badly damaged during the storm. bring and stone walkways were torn up and docks ripped apart. power is also out. so crews are using a temporary lighting system powered by generators to light up the statue. it is shut down indefinitely until repairs can be made. >> i know a lot of people would go live in the crown right now because they are still without power. >> two weeks later. >> they are miserable in parts of new york, new jersey and connecticut and continuing our coverage of sandy's aftermath the power still out for hundreds of tho
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)